Going Green? Get a Third-Party

Have you bought Windex in the past 10 years? Ever see a symbol on the label noted “Greenlist”? In 2001, S.C. Johnson created an in-house “green reporting” program called “Greenlist.” S.C. Johnson used a system that would award its products stars for the level of “green” the products achieved, with 4 stars being greenest. S.C. Johnson however, did not consult with any federal, or other, entities when they determined how green their products were.

Award for tracking their performance with the use of their green products. Windex, being the greenest product S.C. Johnson offers, was able to lower its VOC (volatile organic compounds) percentage to less than 4% while claiming the cleaning power had been increased by 30%.ng the most green. S.C. Johnson however, did not consult with any federal, or other, entities when they determined how green their products were.
In 2006, S.C. Johnson won the U.S. Presidential green Chemistry Challenge

In 2011, S.C. Johnson settled (for unknown amounts) two lawsuits against the company for false claims and misunderstandings of what “Greenlist” actually is (Petlack v. S.C. Johnson & Koh v. S.C. Johnson). The CEO of S.C. Johnson stated “We decided to settle for two reasons. First, while we believed we had a strong

legal case, in retrospect we could have been more transparent about what the logo signified. Second, and very importantly, Greenlist is such a fundamentally sound and excellent process we use to green our products, that we didn’t want consumers to be confused about it due to a logo on one product.”

 

More often than not does the saying hold true, “If you want something done right, do it yourself”.  Being this the case, it never hurts  to get it verified.. especially if the law gets involved.

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